INDEPENDENT NEWS

Fresh Thinking For Farmers

Published: Mon 7 Nov 2005 10:56 AM
7 November 2005
Fresh Thinking For Farmers
In response to the growing interest in local food systems New Zealand Farmers' Markets Association supported by New Zealand Trade and Enterprise is running a series of 8 'Fresh Thinking' workshops.
At five centres in the North Island, and three in the South, attendees will hear about the economic, social and nutritional benefits garnered from Farmers' Markets.
The sessions are aimed at potential stallholders, market managers, community leaders and stakeholders, nutritionists, and those interested in being involved locally in the fast growing global phenomenon of farmers' markets. At present New Zealand boasts approximately one dozen farmers' markets from Kerikeri to Invercargill.
The workshops will be presented by Jane Adams, Chair of the Australian Farmers' Markets Association, and Ian Thomas, interim Chair of the New Zealand association. Jane has been consulting on market start-ups and growth strategies since 1998 whilst Ian was one of the founding stallholders of the Hawke's Bay farmers' market in 2000.
Ian says that "As well as the obvious benefits of buying fresh produce from your local grower, markets have proved to be excellent testing grounds and incubators for food producers". He sites five businesses that began life at the Hawke's Bay market going on to export. "
ENDS

Next in Business, Science, and Tech

Food Prices Increase 7.4 Percent Annually
By: Statistics New Zealand
REINZ July Data: Market Activity And Prices Continue To Ease, First Home Buyers Start To Return To The Market
By: REINZ
Cigna Admits Making False And Misleading Representations
By: Financial Markets Authority
Retail NZ Welcomes Return Of Cruise Ships
By: Retail NZ
ASB Full Year Results: Building Resilience Today And For Our Future
By: ASB Bank
Commerce Commission Issues Draft Determination On News Publishers’ Association’s Collective Bargaining Application
By: Commerce Commission
Auckland Rental Prices Inch Up Again, But Upward Trend Could Ease In Coming Months
By: Barfoot and Thompson
View as: DESKTOP | MOBILE © Scoop Media