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Russia initiates WTO dispute complaint against US duties

Published: Tue 3 Jul 2018 09:45 AM
Russia initiates WTO dispute complaint against US steel, aluminium duties
The Russian Federation has requested WTO dispute consultations with the United States regarding US duties on certain imported steel and aluminium products. The request was circulated to WTO members on 2 July.
Russia claims the US duties of 25% and 10% on imports of steel and aluminium products respectively are inconsistent with provisions of the WTO's General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) 1994 and the Agreement on Safeguards.
Further information is available in document WT/DS554/1.
What is a request for consultations?
The request for consultations formally initiates a dispute in the WTO. Consultations give the parties an opportunity to discuss the matter and to find a satisfactory solution without proceeding further with litigation. After 60 days, if consultations have failed to resolve the dispute, the complainant may request adjudication by a panel.
More on consultations
Current status of disputes

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