INDEPENDENT NEWS

A daughter's kidnapping in Nepal

Published: Sun 9 Nov 2008 06:59 PM
A daughter's kidnapping in Nepal
Kamala sarup
Kathmandu, Nepal, November 07 — The daughter of my friend, Maya, was kidnapped in 2004 from the Dhading district in Nepal. I am writing to express my feelings to her, about the story of her daughter's kidnapping. She received the call the day after her daughter was kidnapped. This unbelievable incident eclipsed her life.
"Your daughter was a unique diamond," I told her. She was about to cry. She felt as if the sky had fallen. "Why are you adding sorrow to my life?" she said, and wept bitterly. The world seemed gloomy.
"What are you going to do next?" I asked mildly. "If you want, you can go to the police post. I am ready to help you there."
Later, my mother told me, "Kamala, your friend Maya, fled away from the village. What a naughty girl!" This news had spread all over the village. Maya and her daughter had belonged to a rich family. They were compared to butterflies when they were seen walking along, playing and jumping. Maya loved her daughter, who was 10 years old. Maya's husband was working as a social worker too. Being an intelligent and clever man, he was able to hold a job that paid Rs. 4,075.
Maya, the daughter of a wealthy village leader, was a lovely, beautiful and attractive young woman. She had said, "I will keep my daughter in my lap." Looking at the tearful eyes of Maya had expressed it to me. "I would like to help you," I had promised in the presence of my mother, while holding Maya's hand.
After her daughter was kidnapped, Maya ignored her family, her husband and had fled. She was going to find her daughter. I heard she reached Kathmandu during the dark night! She worked as a porter, dishwasher and cook in hotels. At night, she tried to forget her difficulties. She wiped away the tears. For several months, she was unable to rent a room. She fought many obstacles. She could not buy meat more than twice a year. Her days passed by doing dishwashing for others. She was always crying for her daughter. She hugged herself for hours by the road, weeping.
She remembered the past, how she sang to make her daughter happy on a full moonlit night under the stars. She couldn't remember more than that. She couldn't find her daughter. She couldn't sleep throughout the night.
ENDS

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