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Cablegate: Media Reaction: U.S., U.S. - China, Economic

Published: Mon 4 Jan 2010 09:03 AM
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R 040903Z JAN 10
FM AMEMBASSY BEIJING
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 7492
INFO RUEHOO/CHINA POSTS COLLECTIVE
RHMFIUU/CDR USPACOM HONOLULU HI
UNCLAS BEIJING 000004
DEPARTMENT FOR INR/R/MR, EAP/CM, EAP/PA, EAP/PD, C
HQ PACOM FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR (J007)
SIPDIS
E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL ECON SENV KGHG KMDR OPRC CH
SUBJECT: MEDIA REACTION: U.S., U.S. - CHINA, ECONOMIC
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Editorial Quotes
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1. U.S.
"No breakthroughs on the DPRK/Iran nuclear issues can be achieved
without the United States"
The Beijing-based newspaper sponsored by official intellectual
publication Guangming Daily and Guangdong Provincial official
publication Nanfang Daily, The Beijing News (Xin Jing Bao)(01/03)(pg
B09): "Although Iran's and the DPRK's stances are different, they
are also the same, because both of them see the United States as
their worst enemy and strike for equal say in their relations with
the United States. Zhang Bo, a renowned military expert, said that
in 2010, the Iran nuclear issue would continue to stir tensions if
there are no improvements in its relations with the West. The
Iranian government seems to get only tougher and tougher as it faces
more and more sanctions. Zhang also said that the DPRK changed its
attitude after the U.S. Special Envoy's visit and that the DPRK
nuclear issue will continue improving. The DPRK's goal, according
to Zhang, is to engage in direct talks with the United States and to
eventually sign a peace agreement and even to establish formal
diplomatic relations with the United States."
2. U.S. - CHINA
"Will China and the U.S. turn against each other in 2010?"
The international news commercial publication of the People's Daily,
Global Times (Huanqiu Shibao)(01/04)(pg 16):"Shi Yinhong, the
Director of the School of International Relations at Renmin
University, said that the United States will sell arms to Taiwan
sooner or later and President Obama will almost for sure meet the
Dalai Lama. Obama just wants to choose the 'most appropriate' time
and venue to do so with minimum negative impact. Chinese President
Hu Jintao will probably visit the United States in April and it is
unlikely that the United States would do anything harmful to China's
interests during that time. Sun Zhe, a researcher from Tsinghua
University argued that there is a 90-percent likelihood the arms
sales to Taiwan, Obama's meeting with the Dalai Lama and trade
disputes will occur concurrently in the first quarter of this year.
Tao Wenzhao, a professor at the Institute of American Studies at the
Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said that in 2010 China and the
United States will be faced with a number of negative factors and
frictions, but we should not be too pessimistic since there are
still many positive factors between the two countries. Obama will
be very cautious in dealing with sensitive issues involving China.
U.S. arms sales to Taiwan should not include such a high-end weapon
as the F-16 airplane. Obama will certainly not meet the Dalai Lama
in the same high-profile way as French President Sarkozy did."
3. ECONOMIC
"Sino-U.S. trade cloudy in 2009 and snowy in 2010"
Guangdong 21st Century Publishing Company Ltd.'s business newspaper,
21st Century Business Herald (21Shiji Jingji Baodao)(01/04)(pg
1):"The United States has finally ruled on imposing 'countervailing'
duties on China's OCTG (Oil Country Tubular Goods) products, which
is by far the largest U. S trade sanction against China. Whether or
not the United States will impose 'anti-dumping' tariffs on China's
OCTG products will be seen as an 'indicator' of the trade battle
between China and the United States. Normally, one year to one
year-and-a-half after economic recession, trade protectionism across
the world reaches its peak, which means we will see frequent trade
frictions in 2010. Chen Zhidong, an arbitrator for the China
International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission, said that
many trade disputes originating from the United States are
extensions of U.S. domestic politics. Chen argued that facing a 10%
plus unemployment rate, reducing import and increasing export tops
any U.S. president's political agenda."
GOLDBERG
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