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Carter Observatory Looks to the Sky for Total Lunar Eclipse

Published: Sat 5 Apr 2014 01:52 PM
Carter Observatory Looks to the Sky for Total Lunar Eclipse
Wellington’s Carter Observatory will be giving visitors the chance to experience one of the sky’s most stunning displays next Tuesday evening (April 15) when the first of two total lunar eclipses this year will be visible from earth.
Viewings of this event will be brought into focus through Carter Observatory’s historic Thomas Cooke telescope, with staff on hand to explain the phenomenon. Tuesday’s event is the first total lunar eclipse since 2011 and (weather permitting) observers will see the Moon have a deep copper hue as it passes through the Earth’s shadow.
Carter Observatory’s John Field says there are a number of factors that should
make Tuesday’s eclipse particularly memorable: “The total lunar eclipse should be visible from early evening and will appear relatively low in the sky and climb higher as the evening progresses. Visitors to Carter Observatory will get a stunning view of it through our telescope.”
A number of Dobsonian telescopes will be placed outside for viewing by Gold Coin donation – with proceeds going towards the upkeep of the charitable institution – will ensure a viewing of the phenomenon. Viewings start at 6pm and will continue throughout the evening till the eclipse ends at 9pm. Until May 4, entry to Carter Observatory’s exhibition is free, giving people another reason to visit one of Wellington’s leading attractions. Cost for viewing through the Cooke Telescope includes a planetarium show.
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