INDEPENDENT NEWS

New series explores how inequities can hinder wellbeing

Published: Wed 26 Jun 2019 09:05 AM
Sign up now to receive Deloitte’s State of the State 2019 series, written in partnership with Victoria University of Wellington
Wellington, 26 June 2019 – Launched today, the Deloitte State of the State New Zealand 2019 series, written in partnership with Victoria University of Wellington’s School of Government and entitled “Building a fair future for all”, explores perspectives on how we can equitably grow wellbeing to build a fair future for all Kiwis.
Deloitte Partner David Lovatt says that a belief in fairness – that everyone has the right to a fair go regardless of their personal characteristics, social condition or access to wealth or resources – lies at the heart of Kiwi values.
“But everyone’s situation is different. Some are born wealthy, live in areas with more jobs and higher incomes, are part of the religious, political or ethnic majority, are smarter or better looking, don’t have mobility challenges or have never suffered from chronic illness. Others are not as lucky. This landscape of inequality is part of the reality of life, but inequities occur when these disparities spill over and erode opportunity,” says Mr Lovatt.
“With the recent launch of government’s first ‘Wellbeing Budget’ one of the greatest risks is that greater wellbeing will fall inequitably across society, and the anticipated social, human and natural capital benefits don’t fall to those who need it most,” he adds.
“On the face of it, increased government investment in wellbeing has the potential to address some inequities by unlocking paths to prosperity that do not depend solely on financial or physical capital. Unfortunately the opposite is also true – that injustice and inequities grow in the social, human and natural capital domains as well.”
The eight-part series looks closely at the causes and effects of inequities in New Zealand and the role of the state as a leader and catalyst of change. Article topics include civic engagement, inclusive growth, digital inclusion and a truly equitable tax system. And the final article will include recommendations for providing a path forward for government, business and communities to build a fair future for all in New Zealand.
“New Zealand will be able to better realise its potential when all members of society are treated fairly and have opportunities to contribute to, and benefit from, increased wellbeing,” concludes Mr Lovatt.
Read the first two articles now and register to receive the remainder of the series here. You’ll then receive a new article roughly every two weeks (but can unsubscribe at any time).
For more on State of the State New Zealand 2019 visit www.deloitte.com/nz/stateofthestate.

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