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Business and parliament need to step up

Published: Wed 22 May 2019 07:57 PM
Business and parliament need to step up to stronger integrity systems says TINZ roadmap
It is beyond time for serious and urgent action to protect and extend integrity in New Zealand
The National Integrity System Assessment 2018 update (NIS 2018) was launched by Transparency International New Zealand today at a parliamentary function. This thorough update of its 2013 assessment shows a good deal of progress in the public sector, but there are big gaps elsewhere.
"While the public sector is waking up to the need to prevent corruption,
progress has been close to non-existent for political party funding, the administration of parliament, civil society and the business sector. Unless the tone at the top improves, our country remains vulnerable to overseas corruption and the trusted society of which we are so proud is at risk," says Suzanne Snively, Chair, Transparency International New Zealand.
The 'Integrity Plus 2013 New Zealand National Integrity System Assessment' has become the definitive guide to anti-corruption and transparency initiatives in New Zealand. Many of the 60 recommendations made in the 2013 assessment have been implemented in whole or in part.
The main aim of this update is to identify and assess changes in New Zealand's National Integrity System since the publication of the 2013 NIS assessment.
The National Integrity System Assessment 2018 update aims its six recommendations at important contributors to our country's reputation, security and wellbeing.
Starting at the top it recommends a code of conduct for Parliamentarians. For our public sector we call for the full implementation of both a comprehensive national anti-corruption strategy, and the latest National Action Plan for the Open Government Partnership. It also urges the public sector to implement relevant recommendations of the 2013 assessment.
Our business, media and civil society are also critical pillars of our integrity system. TINZ calls on each of these sectors to strengthen their own integrity systems, so they and New Zealand can realise the benefits of a high trust society.
Lyn Provost, Patron of Transparency International New Zealand, says "Our goal is for business leaders, senior public officials and civil society managers to recognize the cornerstone nature of the NIS 2013 and NIS 2018 recommendations and apply them to their organizations. This is how they can more fully contribute to ensuring that New Zealand is an open country free from corruption, a good place to do business, a safe place to travel and a great place to live."

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