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Do you know what data is being collected about you?

Published: Wed 7 Nov 2018 11:45 AM
Do you know what data is being collected about you? According to Maori Council; probably not – a call for a national conversation on data sovereignty
New Zealand Maori Council has called on a national conversation when it comes to data sovereignty asking the question “just how many people know what data is being collected, why and how is it being used?”
“One of the really big questions that needs to be asked is do we all know what data others hold on us and what they use it for?” Said Matthew Tukaki, Chair of Maori Council’s Auckland District. The conversation has been kickstarted after Council made a submission to the Whanau Ora Review panel calling into question who owned the data that was being collected about Maori who were recipients of funding and services:
“What’s very clear to many of us is not only the type of data being collected but if its being used at all. Take for example social services and health services being provided through sub-contracts with Government Departments and Commission Agencies – on the one hand do these Departments and Agencies have in place robust data collection, storage and use policies? And is it meaningful in how its being used and interpreted? Or are a whole of service providers collecting things unnecessarily?” Tukaki said
Some of the third party contracts that Government Agencies have in place have clearly been written with little understanding over the importance of data collection and sovereignty. When it comes to Maori there has to be a high degree of trust involved especially considering there are a number of non-Maori organisations providing social services to our people and look how that’s working for us – its not.” Tukaki said
“All the data is telling us we are the most impacted socio-economic group in the country so if they’re collecting so much information about us why are they not using it to find the right solutions; what works and what doesn’t in the provision of services.” Tukaki said.
“The other point that needs to be made is just how much money is spent by service providers who collect data for Government funders when it won’t be used and is just a tick box exercise – this begs the questions of how much more could be invested in the actual service itself.”
Data sovereignty will be raised at the forthcoming National Hui of New Zealand Maori Council with Chair, Sir Taihakurei Durie indicating that the question of who owns the data about our people needing to be put.
ends

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