INDEPENDENT NEWS

Adjournment Debate: National Leader Judith Collins

Published: Fri 7 Aug 2020 10:59 AM
Thank you, Mr Speaker. Firstly, I'd like to turn to acknowledge those who are here today and I wish to start—not to end—with thanks. Those thanks are to yourself, Mr Speaker, for the job you do, even though sometimes I'm sure it's quite difficult—we certainly find it quite difficult, actually. Can I also thank all the other parliamentarians who are here and for those who have decided to leave us at the end of this term, thank you for your contribution—
Hon Chris Hipkins: Too many to name.
Hon JUDITH COLLINS: —and to helping making this such a good place. Of course there's a lot of members of the Labour Party, as the Hon Chris Hipkins is just mentioning, who will be leaving. They may not be planning it, but they'll be going their way home. Thank you very much.
Can I also thank all of the National team. Thank you, team; it's about time. It's about time. Thank you for putting your faith in me and thank you, particularly, to the Hon Simon Bridges and Todd Muller for the support that they have been able to give me in helping us through to this transition. Your efforts are greatly appreciated.
Can I also take the opportunity to thank all those who work in Parliament and around the precinct. Can I particularly thank the Clerk of the House, the Office of the Clerk staff, the Table Office, the Bills Office, Hansard, select committee staff, the messengers, security, the catering and, particularly, the cleaning staff who often work in hours when we are not here. Can I thank the amazing team at the library and all of my staff who I must say recently have grown to such an enormous number I can't remember everyone's names, but that comes with the office.
Can I thank everybody who has kept Parliament running through the COVID-19 lockdowns making sure that we could actually have some form of democracy, even though it seemed extremely limited at the time. And a big thank you to the National Party team, then led by the Hon Simon Bridges, who made sure that there was actually an Opposition voice despite the best efforts for there to be otherwise. So thank you for everybody for doing that.
I've just heard the Prime Minister make what I think is going to be one of those speeches that we're going to look on and we're going to say, "Well, that was very interesting, wasn't it?", because she is going to be more famous than usual and that is going to be because she will be a one-term Labour leader. And that is what I'm here to tell her today. I'm here to tell her today that the last one was Bill Rowling and, good for her, she's about to join him.
Now, I think it is really important that when we look at our energised and extremely, extremely united team, which is full of extraordinary talent—
Hon Phil Twyford: Where are they? Where have they gone?
Hon JUDITH COLLINS: I look instead, I look instead—Phil Twyford's asking, "Where have they gone?" Well, Phil Twyford, he's clearly one of the best performers of Jacinda Ardern's Government, now promoted to No. 4. Well, what does that say about the rest of them? What does it say about the rest of them when they've got Phil Twyford at No. 4 and he's ahead of Dr Megan Woods and Chris Hipkins and just about everybody else. What does that say and what does it say about the excellent work of the Hon Kelvin Davis at No. 2. Isn't that amazing, wonderful—when there's so much talent, so much talent.
Let's just have a look at what, though, is facing New Zealand. This is going to be an extremely important election because it's about who is going to be best able to manage what has been described by the New Zealand Reserve Bank as the biggest economic downturn in 160 years. That is even older than our dear friend Rt Hon Winston Peters. That is 160 years and what did I just hear from the Prime Minister, the leader of the Labour Party? What I hear from the leader of the Labour Party: a whole lot of pixie dust and talking about how everything's just going to be fine. That's what I heard. An awful lot of dust; dust—that was all it was.
Let's just look at this. Let's look at the numbers that Jacinda Ardern did not wish to say. Let's look at the 212,000 New Zealanders who are now receiving the unemployment benefit—212,000 New Zealanders. Surely they need a bit better than being told, "It's all fine. We're in charge." They need something better than that. And how about the 450,000 New Zealanders who are having to receive the wage subsidy? There are 450,000 New Zealanders whose jobs are being kept in place because of the $13 billion that the Government has borrowed in order to keep them in employment.
We agreed with it. We agreed with it because we had to do something. We had to do something. But in that time, in that time, a good finance Minister—a good finance Minister—would have thought of a plan to take us out of it, because it's really easy to close the border. It's really easy to close the border and to say to people, "Well, we only live so far away for the rest of the world." Of course, it's easy to close the border. It's easy to close down the economy.
The hard thing is to get that economy back going again, particularly when two of our biggest export markets, like international tourism and international education, have been, effectively, closed down. And who have got in charge from the Government to look after international tourism? Well, we've got the Hon Kelvin Davis, so what could go wrong? What could possibly go wrong? I can't even remember who's in charge of international education from that side because we've never heard of them.
So we've got the one shining light in the New Zealand economy, which is agriculture—agriculture, an industry that has been in a sector that has been bagged for years by that Government. They hated agriculture. Remember that? They put Damien O'Connor in charge, which shows you how much they thought of it. Absolutely hated it. Remember that, how the farmers with the dirty dairying—dirty dairying, all this sort of stuff. Now, suddenly, farmers are back being trendy. Now, suddenly, farmers are woke. Actually, thankfully, farmers will never be woke. They'll always be on trend. And the trend is National. That's where they're going to be.
I want to say to this Government, "Resource Management Act (RMA) reform." We're getting rid of it. Now, suddenly, after three years, they say, "Oh, a working group told us it was a bad thing." A working group told them it was a bad thing. I wrote to David Parker last year about this time and I said, "The two biggest parties in Parliament should agree on RMA reform. Let's sort it out together." He sent me back a letter on his letterhead with, basically, a one-fingered salute. That's the sort of response you get from a Government like that—a nasty, nasty little response. So we will be getting rid of it. We will get rid of it. We will be putting in place an environmental standards Act and we will be putting in place a planning and development Act. And they will not be the same that that lot would—they're entirely different.
I would like to say too, let's just think about some of the shovel-ready projects we've been hearing about. Where are they? Where is this list? Poor old Phil Twyford—Hon Phil Twyford—and Shane Jones put out a letter, a press release, on April Fool's Day this year saying out to the local councils, "Give us your shovel-ready list and we'll get you the funding. We'll be there with you. We'll help you." What's happened to that shovel-ready list? Not much at all. Seventy-five percent of them haven't been announced and dear old Shane Jones has gone and announced to us all the reason they're not announced is it doesn't quite work with either his schedule or the Prime Minister's schedule. Well, that's a bit of a shame, isn't it?
How about getting people back into work? Not only do we have 212,000 people on the unemployment benefit at the moment we've got 200,000 highly skilled people, most in the construction area, who are underemployed. That means there's not actually enough work for them. Why wouldn't we have those people in work? They should not be reliant on a ministerial visit to tell them they've got a job. That is not good enough. That is absolutely washing your hands of the situation, Mr Jones.
And what are we going to do? Well, I'll tell you what, we're not going to stick up taxes, not like that party will. Why didn't the Prime Minister talk to us about her secret tax list: the asset tax, the wealth tax, or, dare I say it, the death tax. I mean, having to pay a tax just because you die, that's a terrible thing.
Now, let's have a look at this little track record that she's talked about: KiwiBuild. Wasn't that good—KiwiBuild. She went to the last election promising 100,000 houses in 10 years, 16,000 the first term. How many have they got—380, oh, 385, apparently. How about roads? What happened there? They stopped. Electric cars—remember, they were going to electrify the fleet, the Government fleet. I understand they've got 45. They've got 45. And then we had light rail. Remember where that is—somewhere stuck on the ghost train up Mount Roskill.
And talk about New Zealand First—I know the Rt Hon Winston Peters wants to talk. He'll tell you he's a handbrake on them. No, he's not. He's the enabler. There's only one reason the Greens are in Government, and that's because Mr Peters went their way.
So let's just say this. The Prime Minister may wish to give us all a "sweetness and light" talk, but actually it's time for reality. The New Zealand people need to know they have a Government that needs to know what to do. And this Government on this side does. And my message, my final message, to the people of New Zealand is this: there's one way to take charge of life—two ticks blue.

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