INDEPENDENT NEWS

Supporting working women with pay equity: next steps

Published: Tue 14 May 2019 10:12 AM
Hon Iain Lees-Galloway
Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety
Hon Julie Anne Genter
Minister for Women PRESS RELEASE
14 May 2019
Women who aren’t paid the same as men for similar jobs will be given the tools to make a pay equity claim as the Wellbeing Budget delivers a practical solution to gender discrimination in the workplace.
Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety Iain Lees-Galloway and Minister for Women Julie Anne Genter have welcomed the Select Committee’s report on the Equal Pay Amendment Bill and a new investment in pay equity tools and guidance.
“The Coalition Government is tackling our long-term challenges and building an inclusive economy by addressing inequities in pay for women,” Iain Lees-Galloway said.
“Women should not be paid less just because they are working in a female-dominated occupation.”
Pay equity means women and men who perform work of the same value should be paid the same, even though their jobs may be different.
The Equal Pay Amendment Bill makes it easier for workers to raise a pay equity claim by replacing the court-based approach with an accessible process based on the existing bargaining framework.
“Most people who made submissions on the Bill supported its intent in a resounding endorsement for our approach to achieving pay equity,” Julie Anne Genter said.
“A common request was for clearer advice and guidance on making a pay equity claim.”
“An investment of $1 million will be made in the Wellbeing Budget to assist the claims process, and reduce barriers previously experienced by people making pay equity claims,” Iain Lees-Galloway said.
“This includes funding for the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to develop online tools and resources which will improve peoples’ understanding of the pay equity claims process, by providing guidance and data for their claims. This will help reduce disputes, improve bargaining processes and lead to enduring pay equity settlements.”
“By making court action a last resort, we will lower the bar for initiating and resolving a pay equity claim.”
Further changes proposed by Select Committee include:
• Providing clarity on the threshold for making an arguable claim, by clarifying ‘predominantly female’ as a workforce that is, or historically was, approximately 60 per cent or more female.
• Removing the requirement to undergo facilitation before seeking a determination in disputes, to maintain a low threshold to commence bargaining and provide the Courts with greater discretion.
The Equal Pay Amendment Bill is expected to pass into law later this year.
You can read the tabled Select Committee Report: Final report (Equal Pay Amendment Bill) 103-2.
ends

Next in New Zealand politics

PM's Post-Cab 27/5/19: Mental Health Inquiry and the Budget
By: The Scoop Team
New service for young people leaving care
By: New Zealand Government
Too many youths on remand being held in secure facilities
By: RNZ
NZ On Air and RNZ launch new Local Democracy Reporting
By: NZ On Air
On coal’s negative message to today's school protest
By: Gordon Campbell
Police officer should not have engaged in pursuit
By: Independent Police Conduct Authority
Targets overlook the 174000 children living in worst poverty
By: Child Poverty Action Group
Barnardos praises Budget 2019 youth investment
By: Barnardos
The PSA welcomes transition support package
By: Public Service Association
State of Care: Supporting young people on remand
By: Office of the Children's Commissioner
NZ Maori Council comes out swinging
By: New Zealand Maori Council
Almost 200 youth offenders held in police cells
By: RNZ
Students stage “lie in” before strike
By: School Strike 4 Climate
Youth groups collaborate to Elbow Elders for climate action
By: Generation Zero
NZEI Te Riu Roa supports student action on climate change
By: New Zealand Educational Institute
View as: DESKTOP | MOBILEWe're in BETA! Send Feedback © Scoop Media