INDEPENDENT NEWS

Social obligations mean better outcomes for children

Published: Tue 11 Sep 2012 12:35 PM
Hon Paula Bennett
Minister for Social Development
Minister of Youth Affairs
11 September 2012Media Statement
Social obligations mean better outcomes for children
Incorporating important health and wellbeing goals into welfare reform will help ensure children get the best possible start in life says Social Development Minister Paula Bennett.
“Social obligations will ensure dependent children of beneficiaries access and benefit from vital education and health services,” says Mrs Bennett.
“These services are particularly important for vulnerable children as many currently miss out; we have an opportunity to address this through reforms.”
“These obligations are reasonable and achievable and they reflect the expectations most New Zealanders have of parents, this is a positive move for vulnerable families.”
Around 125,000 beneficiary parents support more than 220,000 children.
Social obligations require all beneficiary parents to ensure their children:
• attend 15 hours a week Early Childhood Education (ECE) from age 3
• attend school from age five or six
• enrol with a General Practitioner
• complete core WellChild/Tamariki Ora checks
These social obligations are consistent with the Government’s Key Result Areas, the White Paper on Vulnerable Children, manifesto commitments and the confidence and supply agreement with the ACT party.
“We are mindful there may be barriers like geographical location or capacity so parents will need to make reasonable steps to achieve these goals.”
Our intention is to work with and support parents to comply in the best interests of children and if they struggle to comply for any reason they could be referred to specific support services to get further help.
“But where barriers do not exist and parents don’t meet these obligations, graduated sanctions could apply,” says Mrs Bennett.
The graduated sanction process will see parents receive three reminder opportunities to comply before a maximum 50 per cent financial sanction applies.
“We have made it easy to re-comply, with plenty of opportunities and in the interests of the child, have capped the sanction at 50 percent.”
Parents may receive a higher level of case management support at any stage in the process if they are considered to be high risk, have complex needs or a level of vulnerability that requires additional support.
These social obligations will come into effect in July 2013 and cost around $1.4 million a year to administrate.
ENDS

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