INDEPENDENT NEWS

Yet another ‘fail’ for charter schools

Published: Thu 8 Dec 2016 09:46 AM
Yet another ‘fail’ for charter schools
Teachers in public schools are not surprised to hear that the success rates being touted by charter schools are not true at all.
PPTA president Angela Roberts says, “Charter schools are a bad idea, for a multitude of reasons, but to hear that their so-called success rates are not based on fair measures is disheartening.”
“We question why the government put in place a different system for measuring student success for charter schools in the first place.”
Yesterday’s PISA results demonstrated yet again that countries that push policies of competition and privatisation in education fail to achieve at the levels of countries that support their public education systems.
“Comparing the USA and Sweden, which have done the most to promote charter schools, and perform below New Zealand, to Singapore, Japan or Estonia, which don’t have them at all and are at the top of the world, gives a pretty clear message of who we should and shouldn’t be learning from,” said Angela Roberts.
“High quality public education is a cornerstone of our society. It is innovative, successful and transparent. We believe government should focus on what’s working, and not spend any more time or money propping up inadequate alternatives like charter schools.”
ENDS.

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