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Nano tech fabricated into new use

Published: Tue 2 Aug 2011 08:46 AM
Nano tech fabricated into new use
By Peter Kerr for sticK
(sticK - 2 August 2011 ) Nano technology's been touted as the next big thing…..for quite a while now when you think about it.
But so far there's been precious little product that found its way into everyday use; not counting cosmetic products with nano particles that no one's too sure what effect they have.
However British-based Kiwi Simon McMaster may be onto a use of nano technology, which he describes as 'bucket chemistry' in developing a fabric that's able to register a person's vital signs.
Up till now, being able to measure factors such as heart rate or respiration via a piece of clothing required the incorporation of fine, usually comparatively brittle, wires into the fabric.
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http://sticknz.net/2011/08/02/nano-tech-fabricated-into-new-use/
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For sticK – science, technology, innovation & commercialisation KNOWLEDGE - is a new Wellington based news service concentrating on following the money from ideas to income. Contact editor Peter Kerr at peter.kerr055 @ gmail.com
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