INDEPENDENT NEWS

Longest Day Golf Challenge – Teeing Off For A Great Cause

Published: Thu 1 Dec 2022 10:03 AM
The Cancer Society is excited to launch this year’s Longest Day Golf Challenge, which raises essential funds to support people affected by cancer. We invite participants to test their skills and endurance on the golf course by completing four rounds of golf – a whopping 72 holes - in just one day. Not only can you play on one of the longest days of the year, but challenge yourself to make it through a very long day of golf from sunrise to sunset!
The Cancer Society is once again collaborating with Golf New Zealand to promote Longest Day Golf Challenge, and golfers can take part or donate anywhere in the country. There are 390 golf clubs in New Zealand, 500,000 players, and 120,204 registered golf club members. Golf is among the most socially and demographically diverse sports played in New Zealand. And approximately 25,000 New Zealanders are diagnosed with cancer each year. This year, the longest day falls on Thursday 22 December, but participants can play on any day in December or January that suits them.
Golfers Sam Hale and Sam Davimes from Auckland have teamed up for their first attempt at Longest Day Golf Challenge and are hoping to raise $3000 to recognise family and friends who have been through cancer. The pair are playing all 72 holes at Pupuke golf club, one of the hillier golf courses in Auckland. Sam Davimes says, “This is such a great cause and I want to give back to people battling cancer while playing the sport I love. The most golf I’ve played in a day is 36 holes so I’m keen to test my mental and physical endurance”.
Cancer Society Chief Executive Lucy Elwood agrees that the Longest Day Golf Challenge is a great way to celebrate summer while raising vital funds for those impacted by cancer: “We are extremely grateful to those who want to come out and raise funds so that we can be there for New Zealanders during one of the most difficult times of their lives. Your support will allow us to provide safe transport to and from treatment, counselling services and accommodation for patients”.
Golf New Zealand Chief Executive Dean Murphy said the sporting body was proud to be supporting the Cancer Society’s sporting-based fundraising effort, and encouraged golfers across New Zealand to get involved wherever they could – either as playing fundraisers, or encouraging teams on their gruelling fairway journeys.
“Playing four rounds of golf in one day requires a huge effort but it’s one worth making to raise funds for such an important organisation like the Cancer Society. Our best wishes go out to all those golfers embarking on their 72-hole one day journey over the coming months,” said Murphy.
As New Zealand Professional Golfers’ Association member Sam Davimes summarises: “I never realised how many people are diagnosed with cancer each year in New Zealand. I’m very grateful to be fit and healthy enough to have the opportunity to play 72 holes in a day. Every donation will make a real difference, even if it’s just towards transport and accommodation costs”.
The Cancer Society and Golf New Zealand invite golfers to dust off their clubs and get ready for The Longest Day Golf Challenge. Choose the day, the course, tell your mates and make a team – or you can do it solo.
If you would like to find out more about the Cancer Society’s Longest Day Golf Challenge including how to sign up and get involved anywhere in the country, you can visit www.longestday.org.nz

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