INDEPENDENT NEWS

UN experts appalled by Israeli court decision

Published: Tue 11 Sep 2018 10:50 AM
An Israeli High Court ruling giving the Government of Israel the green light to demolish the entire Palestinian Bedouin community of Khan al-Ahmar Ab al Helu, has been described as “appalling” by two UN human rights experts*.
“It is gravely disappointing that a High Court can take a decision that is totally against the fundamental principles of international human rights law and international humanitarian law,” said Michael Lynk, the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian Territory occupied since 1967 and Leilani Farha, the Special Rapporteur on adequate housing as a component of the right to an adequate standard of living.
“This appalling decision could trigger the eviction of 180 inhabitants, including more than 90 children, putting them at imminent risk of forcible transfer,” they added.
“Forced eviction constitutes a gross violation of the right to adequate housing under international human rights law. In addition, forcible transfer of people who are protected within an occupied territory is a grave breach of the Fourth Geneva Convention, and amounts to a war crime under the 1998 Rome Statute,” the experts said.
“If the demolition of the village goes ahead and results in the residents having to move out of their current location, all those responsible for this international crime should be held accountable.”
The experts’ comments follow a decision on 5 September to dismiss the latest petitions by residents of Khan al-Ahmar, some 15 km northeast of Jerusalem in the West Bank.
The Special Rapporteurs are also urging Israel, as the occupying power, to stop the eviction.
“It is time to regularize their situation and respect the rights of the Khan al-Ahmar residents to remain on the lands they have inhabited for decades,” the experts added.
The residents of Khan al-Ahmar are descendants of Bedouins expelled from the Negev by Israel in the 1950s. They were relocated in the West Bank, on the outskirts of Jerusalem. Their village is situated between two large Israeli settlements, Ma’ale Adumim and Kfar Adumim, and an Israeli industrial zone called Mishor Adumim. The residents have been subjected to constant pressure by the Israeli authorities and neighbouring settlers and have been living in what has been described as an “increasingly coercive environment” that may leave no other choice to the community but to move.

Next in World

The Gili Islands: a community earthquake recovery effort
By: Joseph Cederwall
Gordon Campbell on the ongoing carnage in Gaza
By: Gordon Campbell
Refugees in PNG being pushed to the brink, Amnesty says
By: RNZ
Rapid Action Urged as Key UN Climate Change Conference Opens
By: UNFCCC
Ramzy Baroud: When Bolsonaro and Netanyahu Are ‘Brothers’
By: Ramzy Baroud
Australian and PNG leaders must act urgently to save lives
By: Amnesty International
UN climate conference agreement: Mixed reactions
By: RNZ
Climate change risk assessment faces uninsurable 'conundrum'
By: RNZ
At COP24, world nations agree on a concrete way forward
By: United Nations
New Era of Global Climate Action To Begin
By: UNFCCC
UN Secretary-General's remarks at the conclusion of the COP2
By: United Nations
‘Going green’ is good business says private sector at UN
By: UN News
COP24 addresses climate change displacement
By: United Nations
G20 told COP24 climate change conference 'must succeed'
By: United Nations
View as: DESKTOP | MOBILEWe're in BETA! Send Feedback © Scoop Media