INDEPENDENT NEWS

EU Countries Endorse Pact On Tropical Timber

Published: Mon 21 Dec 2009 09:54 AM
European Countries Endorse UN-Backed Pact On Tropical Timber
New York, Dec 18 2009 7:10PM Eleven European countries have ratified a United Nations-backed agreement designed to promote the sustainable management of forests producing tropical timber and a diverse and legal international trade in such products.
Representatives of Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain took part in a ceremony at UN Headquarters in New York yesterday to indicate their country’s support for the International Tropical Timber Agreement.
The agreement was adopted in January 2006 to serve as a successor to a previous pact but will only enter into force once a certain proportion of major exporting and importing countries have ratified it.
The pact aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and to improve the management of forests in tropical countries by addressing illegal logging and deforestation while supporting the rehabilitation of degraded forests.
Annebeth Rosenboom, Chief of the Treaty Section of the UN’s Office of Legal Affairs (OLA), welcomed the signature by Germany and the ratifications and said they would help bring the key agreement closer to its entry into force, perhaps as early as next year.
ENDS

Next in World

Human Rights ‘Catastrophe’ In Myanmar: UN Calls For Urgent Action
By: UN News
Afghanistan’s Healthcare System On Brink Of Collapse, As Hunger Hits 95 Per Cent Of Families
By: UN News
Third COVID Wave Engulfs Yemen With 99 Per Cent Of People Unvaccinated
By: Oxfam
Global Leaders Set To Act To Increase Energy Access While Reducing Emissions At First UN Energy Summit In 40 Years
By: UN Department of Global Communications
More Than 130 Countries Expected To Announce National Commitments At UN Food Systems Summit
By: UN Department of Global Communications
Only 2% Of Covid-19 Vaccines Have Been Administered In Africa
By: UN News
View as: DESKTOP | MOBILE © Scoop Media