INDEPENDENT NEWS

Cablegate: Media Reaction: Taiwan, U.S.-China Trade Disputes,

Published: Tue 1 Sep 2009 09:35 AM
VZCZCXRO5873
RR RUEHCN RUEHGH RUEHVC
DE RUEHBJ #2489 2440935
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 010935Z SEP 09
FM AMEMBASSY BEIJING
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 5848
INFO RUEHOO/CHINA POSTS COLLECTIVE
RHMFIUU/CDR USPACOM HONOLULU HI
UNCLAS BEIJING 002489
DEPARTMENT FOR INR/R/MR, EAP/CM, EAP/PA, EAP/PD, C
HQ PACOM FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR (J007)
SIPDIS
E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL ECON KMDR OPRC CH
SUBJECT: MEDIA REACTION: TAIWAN, U.S.-CHINA TRADE DISPUTES,
ENVIRONMENT
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Editorial Quotes
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1. TAIWAN
"U.S. secretly pushing cross-Strait military relations for own
benefit"
The China Radio International sponsored newspaper World News Journal
(Shijie Xinwenbao)(09/01)(pg 4): "During a recent visit to Taiwan, a
researcher at an American think tank said the two sides of the
Strait can now begin to develop a 'military mutual trust system.'
This indicates that the Obama administration intends to push Taiwan
towards the early development of a 'military mutual trust system'
with the Mainland. In fact, the U.S. does not worry about whether
or not this system would harm U.S. interests, since it believes that
Taiwan is unable to rid itself of U.S. influence and unable to
unilaterally hold talks with the Mainland over a "military mutual
trust system" without U.S. involvement. What's more, by promoting
'cross-Strait military mutual trust,' the U.S. can benefit in three
ways: placate the Mainland, interfere in the cross-Strait issue, and
further U.S. interests, specifically by urging the Mainland abandon
the use of force as a viable means of resolving the Taiwan issue and
by gaining more military information on the Mainland by pushing it
to be more transparent with Taiwan. For the Mainland, a necessary
precondition for establishing a "military mutual trust system" is to
agree on China's unification, a condition Taiwan does not accept.
In fact, the U.S. knows that cross-Strait disputes are beneficial to
its interests. The U.S. does not want to see the Mainland and
Taiwan get too close and unite."
2. U.S.-CHINA TRADE DISPUTES
"The final fight"
Guangdong 21st Century Publishing Company's business newspaper 21st
Century Business Herald (21 Shiji Jingji Baodao) (09/01)(pg 3):
(Related to the U.S.-China tire trade issue) "The Obama
administration cannot ignore the voice of China. The U.S. special
protection measures on tires have caused widespread unease in many
related industries in China. Leaders of some Chinese industry
associations have advocated strong retaliatory measures to prevent
the U.S. from adopting similar special protection measures against
other industries in the future. At the end of September, Obama will
host the G20 summit in Pittsburg and meet with Chinese leaders. It
will be very embarrassing at that time if Obama decides to impose
high punitive tariffs on Chinese tires. If he decides to do this,
Obama, who has always been an advocate of free trade, will
inevitably face criticism for adopting protectionist policies and
potentially starting a trade war. Cooper Tires, the fourth largest
tire company in the U.S., has taken a stand against the proposed
special protection measures. Chinese experts argue that Cooper
Tires' position means a lot for China since it shows that some U.S.
companies believe they do not need the protections. Most of Chinese
companies are starting to prepare for both possible outcomes of
Obama's decision on the issue."
3. ENVIRONMENT
"Practical measures must be taken to develop a low-carbon economy"
The official Communist Party international news publication Global
Times (Huanqiu Shibao)(09/01)(pg 15): "On August 12, the State
Council passed a draft environmental law to regulate greenhouse gas
emissions and create a long-term strategy for addressing climate
change within various levels of government. Thus, the regulations
necessary for the creation of a low-carbon economy have been
formally laid out. Most companies in China cannot afford to invest
in low-carbon production methods due to the huge cost and delayed
profits. Many companies are forced to adopt energy-intensive
production methods due to the lack of manpower, resources, and
budget. What's more, local governments often fail to effectively
maintain environmental protection facilities built with central
government money because they are unwilling to pay for maintenance
out of local funds. The most difficult obstacle for China is the
attitude of its citizens. There is still a large gap between the
views of Chinese citizens and the views developed countries'
citizens on environmental protection. China must make progress in
developing a low-carbon economy; otherwise, it will be unable to
have a smooth economic transformation."
HUNTSMAN
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