INDEPENDENT NEWS

Cablegate: Tip in Turkey: Jandarma Requests Tech Assistance,

Published: Tue 7 Dec 2004 01:49 PM
This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.
UNCLAS ANKARA 006801
SIPDIS
SENSITIVE
DEPARTMENT FOR G/TIP, G, INL, INL/CTR, DRL, EUR/PGI, EUR/SE
DEPARTMENT FOR VALERIE KWOK USAID E/ECA
E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: KCRM PHUM PGOV SMIG PREF KWMN TU TIP IN TURKEY
SUBJECT: TIP IN TURKEY: JANDARMA REQUESTS TECH ASSISTANCE,
TRAINING FROM DEA, OTHERS
REF: A. ANK 6309
B. ANK 6692
1. (SBU) SUMMARY: A November 23-27 International Office on
Migration (IOM) TIP workshop in Adana, Turkey highlighted the
Jandarma's struggling but developing ground-level ability to
investigate and prosecute trafficking crimes. According to
IOM trainers (para 4) and TIP-NGO victim counselors
(reftels), Jandarma officers are successfully screening,
identifying, and assisting victims. Jandarma officers noted,
however, the immediate need for technical training from law
enforcement agencies with practical experience in conducting
TIP investigations, documenting evidence, and prosecuting
traffickers. Post requests G/TIP assistance in identifying
possible training opportunities for Jandarma officers. END
SUMMARY.
2. (SBU) During the November 23-27 IOM TIP workshop in Adana,
Turkey, regional Jandarma commander MGEN Abdulkadir Eryilmaz
queried AMCONS Adana PO about possible counter-trafficking
training opportunities for Jandarma officers. Eryilmaz said
that, in Turkey, drug trafficking and human trafficking are
often interrelated, and that Turkish Jandarma could
particularly benefit from U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
expertise and training in hands-on, technical-level, textbook
efficient investigations.
3. (U) Embassy Ankara and AMCONS Adana request G/TIP's
assistance in identifying opportunities for including Turkish
Jandarma forces in counter-trafficking training programs
available through the DEA, FBI or other law enforcement
agencies.
4. (U) Eryilmaz opened the IOM training session, stressing
the importance of focused law enforcement efforts on illicit
trafficking issues.
BEGIN PRESS NOTES:
TURKEY - Training for Law Enforcement Leads to Rescue of
Victims of Trafficking: IOM organized training sessions for
law enforcement officers have led to the rescue of more than
100 women and girls trafficked to Turkey in 2004.
Speaking at the latest five-day session, held last week in
Adana, IOM Chief of Mission Marielle Lindstrom stressed the
role that collaboration plays between the authorities, NGOs,
and international organizations to rescue victims and assist
them to return home. "The positive case studies we heard
from the officers, where victims have been rescued and
traffickers apprehended, prove that with proper support and
training Turkish law enforcement is a serious threat to
organized crime. If we can establish a successful mechanism
to identify, rescue and refer the victims, Turkey will be of
central importance in stopping trafficking from countries in
the region."
The workshop was carried out with the support of the Central
Command of the Gendarma, with presentations from the
Ministries of Justice and Interior, international
organizations and the Embassy of Belarus. International
experts also addressed the issue of human rights, collection
of evidence, and the prosecution of traffickers.
"It is important that victims of trafficking are correctly
identified so that they are not deported as irregular
immigrants. Victims must feel safe, respected and protected
so that law enforcement can work with them to stop
trafficking," stressed Europol expert Steve Harvey.
The Adana training was funded by the US Government, with
contributions form the United Nations Population Fund.
END PRESS NOTES.
EDELMAN
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