INDEPENDENT NEWS

Joint research project leads to high profile

Published: Wed 6 Dec 2006 03:50 PM
News release from Industrial Research Limited
6 December 2006
Joint research project leads to high profile double
A team of New Zealand researchers has achieved a rare double with new research results being published in two top international physics journals in the same month.
The results stem from a joint project looking at nanoclusters and their use in tiny electronic devices, and is part of work being undertaken by researchers at Industrial Research, Victoria University of Wellington, University of Canterbury and Christchurch-based Nano Cluster Devices Ltd.
The team’s papers were published in November in the world’s two most prestigious physics journals, Physical Review Letters and Applied Physics Letters, and contained new findings from the collaborative work.
The paper in Physical Review Letters described a fundamental understanding of the way tiny particles, often called nanoclusters, behave when they are fired at a solid surface. The Applied Physics Letters article showed how this understanding can be exploited to fabricate electronic devices comprising wires which are 1000 times thinner than a human hair.
“This is a high profile double. It’s very rare to get papers appearing in both of the world’s top physics journals so close together,” according to Dr Shaun Hendy of Industrial Research.
The team of researchers conducted computer simulations of more than 30,000 individual nanocluster collisions to find out what happens to bouncing particles which are nanoscale in size.
The simulations showed that nanoclusters, although they are much stickier than their macroscopic counterparts, can still bounce off surfaces if the conditions are right. In fact, if the velocity of the nanoparticles is tuned correctly, the researchers found that the nanoparticles will bounce off parts of a surface that are flat, yet stick to parts of a surface that have been pre-patterned.
Nanoscale electronic devices can then be assembled by pre-patterning surfaces and depositing nanoparticles at the right velocity. Interestingly, the computer simulations showed that this bounce-stick behaviour can occur at both low velocities, resulting in elastic collisions, and at high velocities, leading to very inelastic collisions.
“The publication of our results in these international journals illustrates the high quality of the science behind our nanotechnology development programme,” said Dr Simon Brown of Nano Cluster Devices Ltd.
“Our new understanding of the cluster bouncing process has allowed us to develop new tools for assembly of nanoelectronic devices.”
Patent applications are been filed covering the findings.
The collaborative research project is funded by the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology. The team of researchers are all part of the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, a Centre of Research Excellence. The team acknowledged the importance of the funding and the MacDiarmid Institute in providing the infrastructure for their work.
ENDS

Next in Business, Science, and Tech

Tiwai Deal Gives Time For Managed Transition
By: New Zealand Government
Reserve Bank Responding To Illegal Breach Of Data System
By: The Reserve Bank of New Zealand
New Zealanders Have Their Hopes Up For 2021
By: Horizon Research Limited
Data Use Soars Over New Year’s Eve As Kiwis Stay Connected Digitally
By: Vodafone NZ
Lack Of Competitive Pressure Leads To An Undesirable Trading Situation
By: Electricity Authority
SEEK NZ Employment Report - Strong Job Ad Performance In Quarter Four, Job Ads Up 19% On Quarter Three
By: SEEK
2020: New Zealand’s 7th-warmest Year On Record
By: NIWA
Property Market Set To Cool From Sizzling To Warm In 2021
By: Quotable Value New Zealand
PriceSpy Research Reveals How Shopping Behaviours Have Changed This Christmas
By: PriceSpy
Noel Leeming Group Warned For Making Delivery Representations Without Reasonable Grounds During COVID-19 Lockdown
By: Commerce Commission
Gordon Campbell On The Excessive Secrecy Surrounding Cyber Hacks, And Some Lost Soul Legends
By: Gordon Campbell
Reserve Bank cyber attack: Third party involved can provide clues on info exposed - expert
By: RNZ
Digital Christmas: Online Traffic Spikes As Kiwis Connect With Friends And Whānau Online
By: Vodafone
Greens: Electricity Market Reforms Needed
By: Green Party
Calls For Tough Penalty For Meridian After Watchdog Finding
By: Flick Electric
View as: DESKTOP | MOBILE © Scoop Media