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Transpower-sponsored research laboratory launched

Published: Mon 4 Dec 2000 08:48 AM
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Transpower-sponsored research laboratory launched at Lincoln University
Lincoln University’s ability to work with industry and research organisations providing quick, effective answers to complex computational problems gets a boost from Monday/today (4 Dec.) thanks to national electricity transmission company Transpower New Zealand Ltd.
Funding from Transpower has seen the launching (Monday 4 Dec.) of a dedicated computational laboratory within Lincoln University’s Centre for Advanced Computational Solutions (C-fACS).
The centre, established in June last year, offers state-of-the-art computational solutions backed by world class scientific research. It was formed to provide task specific, integrated solutions to emerging industry problems from the perspective of a broad scientific base, and it can operate quickly, effectively and without large corporate overheads.
Now, with the addition of the Transpower-sponsored laboratory, the centre’s capability has been boosted significantly.
“The link with Transpower is an example of the sort of fruitful interactions with industry which C-fACS aims to develop,” says Centre chairman Professor Don Kulasiri of Lincoln University.
“These interactions will be developed on an equal partnership basis to solve industry problems and use them as a basis for advanced research so that we also provide next-generation solutions. At the same time the interactions allow us to expose our postgraduate students to real-world problems, so educationally there is an important function too.”
Among the centre’s governing members is Ramesh Rayudu, a senior research engineer with Transpower who will be based in the new laboratory.
Ramesh has just completed PhD at Lincoln University with a project which has produced one of the world’s most advanced frameworks of artificial intelligence for fault diagnosis. The project has been aimed at producing a system for Transpower that makes fault diagnosis and repairs more efficient and reduces the time that consumers are without power.
His research has been at the high end of artificial intelligence and has pushed the boundaries of existing artificial intelligence techniques.
Ramesh will now be based at C-fACS in the new Transpower high performance laboratory.
Features of the laboratory include a Beowulf power processing computer cluster and advanced software in hi-spec machines.
end

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