'Revving Up' World-First Fuel Injection

Published: Thu 5 Oct 2000 02:58 PM
Simon Longdill has a passion for engines.
This passion is the driving force behind a research project he is doing for Buckley Systems Ltd that is poised to deliver an innovative fuel injection system for two-stroke engines. The research centres on developing a sensor that can control the fuel flow of a two-stroke engine by being able to "read" the air-fuel ratio inside the engine.
Previous attempts to implement fuel injection systems on high performance two-stroke engines have failed because of the systems' inability to respond to sudden changes in the engine's fuel requirements. Testing over more than two years by Mr Longdill indicates that this can be overcome by measuring the air-fuel ratio of each combustion cycle.
"We can use a fibre-optic cable to look down into the engine and then electronically read the colour of the flame, which is strongly related to the air-fuel ratio," Mr Longdill says. "Once we know the air-fuel ratio that is burning in the cylinder during the combustion process, we can control it by using an electric fuel injection that alters the fuel flow."
Mr Longdill has now finalised the test measurement system, with encouraging results from the test engine. "I am very excited about this development," he says.
Mr Longdill is a graduate of the University of Auckland's Engineering School and is undertaking the research project as part of his study towards a PhD. His project was supported by the Technology for Industry Fellowship scheme of the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology. The scheme gives tertiary students an opportunity to work with businesses.
He approached Buckley Systems - a company specialising in manufacturing ion beam lines for the production of silicon chips - about some project work. The idea of a two-stroke sensor came out of their discussions because Buckley was planning to run a fuel injection system on its New Zealand-made 500 GP racing bikes.
It is expected that Mr Longdill's electronic device will help maximise engine efficiency and performance, meaning lower fuel consumption, higher output and reduced operating costs.
Buckley research and development engineer Wayne Wright says the device is an industry first and proves the value of academia working within an R structure, supported by government through Technology New Zealand. "Simon's innovative approach has far-reaching ramifications within the automotive world, with great opportunity for New Zealand-based manufacture of complete systems and/or licensing agreements with engine design teams," Mr Wright says.
Contact: * Wayne Wright, Buckley Systems Ltd, Ph:(09) 573-2214. Email * Simon Longdill, University of Auckland, School of Engineering. Ph: (09) 373-7599 Extn 7254. Email: * Nigel Metge, Technology New Zealand at the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (Auckland Office), (09) 912-6730, or 021 454-095. Website:
Prepared on behalf of the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology by ID Communications. Contact: Ian Carson (04) 477-2525. Email:

Next in Business, Science, and Tech

Mice successfully eradicated from Antipodes Island
By: New Zealand Government
Roadmap to harness $1.5 billion transport tech sector
By: New Zealand Government
GDP rises on strength in services
By: Statistics New Zealand
More measures to protect Hector’s dolphins
By: New Zealand Government
Helping international innovators connect
By: New Zealand Government
Current account deficit widens to $2.0 billion
By: Statistics New Zealand
Lyttelton port workers on strike from midnight
By: Rail And Maritime Transport Union
"Licensed to krill" - Greenpeace exposes Antarctic fishing
By: Greenpeace
Predator Free success on Antipodes Island
By: New Zealand National Party
Mouse blitz team leaves for Antipodes
By: Department of Conservation
Antipodes expedition leaves today
By: Joint Press Release
Hackathon Winner Puts Focus on Improving RL Driver Skills
Hackathon focus on restricted licence drivers skills
NZTA calls for hi-tech ideas to make roads safer
Intelligent transport systems could earn $1.5 billion a year
By: BusinessNZ
View as: DESKTOP | MOBILEWe're in BETA! Send Feedback © Scoop Media