INDEPENDENT NEWS

Pay equity settlement for support workers

Published: Fri 22 Jun 2018 12:03 PM
Hon David Clark
Minister of Health
22 June 2018 PĀNUI PĀPĀHO
MEDIA STATEMENT
Pay equity settlement for mental health and addiction support workers
Health Minister Dr David Clark is pleased to announce an estimated 5,000 mental health and addiction support workers will soon receive the same pay rates as care and support workers.
“This Government is committed to pay equity and lifting wages, particularly for our lowest paid workers,” said David Clark.
In an agreement with unions and employers, the Government will extend the Care and Support Workers (Pay Equity) Settlement Act to include mental health and addiction support workers.
Nearly half will get an increase of more than $3 per hour which means full-time workers will be paid approximately an extra $120 a week before tax. A further 20 percent of workers will get an increase of more than $5 per hour or around an extra $200 for a 40-hour week.
The new pay scale reflects workers’ qualifications and experience. It will be back-dated to 1 July 2017.
“This agreement puts right a problem created by the previous Government, which deliberately excluded mental health and addiction workers from the Care and Support Workers settlement. These workers often support New Zealanders when they are most vulnerable and they deserve a fair go. This Government has delivered that,” says Dr Clark.
“Ensuring our mental health and addiction workers are paid what they deserve will help deliver a robust workforce,” says Dr Clark.
The $173.5 million settlement extension will be implemented over a five-year term and funded through an increase to Vote Health.
“I would like to thank the Public Service Association, E tū, the Council of Trade Unions and provider representatives for the crucial and constructive role they played in successfully negotiating the agreement,” Dr Clark said.
“And my thanks also go to the employers who will implement the new wage structure and pay the new rates to their staff.”
Background
There are an estimated 5,000 people in New Zealand’s mental health and addiction workforce.
The Care and Support Workers (Pay Equity) Settlement Act increased the pay rates of 55,000 care and support workers in aged and disability residential care, and home and community support services but didn’t include mental health and addiction support workers.
A claim was lodged with the Employment Relations Authority by the Public Service Association and E tū, seeking that mental health and addiction support workers be paid the same increased wage rates.
The Government agreed to negotiate an agreement to extend the Act.
ends

Next in New Zealand politics

Gordon Campbell on the nurses strike
By: Gordon Campbell
Fixing our broken justice system: first steps
By: New Zealand Government
Renters group pushes for tougher laws for landlords
By: RNZ
Commissioner questions merit of biodegradable plastics
By: Parliamentary Commissioner For The Environment
New innovation fund part of public media funding allocation
By: New Zealand Government
The Nation: NZNO, NZEI and EMA
By: The Nation
Why are nurses striking?
By: RNZ
New labour law settings will stoke inflation
By: BusinessDesk
UPDATE: Govt, DHBs say no more funding available
By: BusinessDesk
Nurses, DHBs going into ERA-facilitated bargaining
By: BusinessDesk
Facilitation talks completed this morning
By: NZNO
Nursing and Midwifery DHB MECA rejected
By: NZNO
Nurses’ strike concludes
By: District Health Boards
DHB – strike response update
By: All District Health Boards
DHBs acknowledge staff and volunteers in strike response
By: All District Health Boards
View as: DESKTOP | MOBILEWe're in BETA! Send Feedback © Scoop Media