robson-on-politics Tues 30 Aug

Published: Tue 30 Aug 2005 06:13 PM
robson-on-politics Tues 30 Aug
robson-on-politics, a newsletter from Matt Robson MP
Deputy Leader of the Progressive Party
People feel acute shiver down the spine
The Fourth Labour Government of the 1980s 'presented' themselves as compassionate in their PR spin.
But their programme delivered rising unemployment, welfare dependency and crime, rising central government debt to pay for big income tax cuts for the richest among us and of course the sale of the family silver at bargain basement prices.
That's why most people old enough to remember the last time we had a Labour Government felt an acute shiver down the spine upon hearing that the two Rogers (Douglas and Kerr) offered their free and frank advice to Dr. Brash on how he should 'present' himself upon his ascension to National's leadership two years ago.,2106,3392098a14095,00.html
Verdict on Ruthenasia due Sept 17
If Rogernomics in the '80s is remembered for unsustainable income tax cuts for the rich at the expense of the poor, then the sequel of Ruthenasia of the '90s was significant cut-backs to public education and health services, a further assault on low income families' incomes and employment opportunities, and still still further asset sales.
Roger Douglas and Ruth Richardson were celebrating the achievements of the ACT zealots in the 1980s and 1990s under First Past The Post, but MMP is a more challenging environment for the ACT Agenda.
On September 17, citizens will either endorse the National/ACT/United Future/NZ First proposal for higher overseas debt, higher interest rates, higher unemployment and lower income taxes, or, more likely they'll vote for New Zealand's long-term national interest represented by the Left coalition instead.
Rogernomics won't sell, so try Maori-bashing
Surveys of New Zealand's values indicate clearly that Rogernomics won't sell. People want security and jobs, public services and national development.
That is why National won't talk a great deal about their overseas debt-financed tax hand-outs over the next 17 days, but will talk a lot more about their other "bottom lines".
One of National's bottom lines will be taken straight from the ACT/Business Roundtable toolkit of electoral tricks and involves trying to drive a big, fat wedge between Maori and non-Maori.
National is going to tell us, for example, that disenfranchising voters in the seven Maori electorates, is "a bottom line". The strategy seeks to appeal to all non-Maori but will fail because there isn't any electoral bloc of "non-Maori.",2106,3393236a10,00.html
Right wing parties tearing each other apart
Journalists I have talked to about the leaked emails to Don Brash from the Business Roundtable, ACT's President and Founder all agree that about two things.
First, it indicates that National is internally divided. And secondly, that ACT will over the next three weeks try to win the seat of Epsom no matter what the cost is to National's electoral fortunes.
Given the fall-out within and between National and its allies, it is becoming clearer by the hour that the next government is going to be a coalition led by Helen Clark.
The reason Progressive wants to be represented at the next coalition Cabinet is to progress our key policies and two that I have been talking to people about around the country in the last few days relate to housing and how to turn the tide against the harm being caused by alcohol.
A party vote for Progressive is a vote to help us empower families to capitalize their Family Support in order to get a deposit for their first home.
A party vote Progressive is also a vote to help us focus Parliament's attention on the need to seriously listen to the evidence from the public health professionals and take bold steps like raise the alcohol purchasing age to 20 and introduce strict controls on the TV broadcast advertising of liquor.

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