INDEPENDENT NEWS

TTR agrees project is different to Chatham Rock Phosphate

Published: Wed 1 Oct 2014 05:24 PM
1 October 2014
Media Statement
For Immediate Release
TTR agrees its project is different to Chatham Rock Phosphate
Trans - Tasman Resources notes a number of media outlets reporting that Chatham Rock Phosphate is distancing itself from TTRs project. TTR agrees that the projects are very different noting that the main differences can be summarised as follows:
1. The TTR project is in a high energy shallow water ecosystem, evolved to respond to disturbance which occurs naturally on a very frequent basis – unlike the stable ecosystems that occur in deep water.
2. Experts noted no recordings of rare, endangered or protected seabed-dwelling species in TTR’s project area.
3. TTRs near shore operation makes it vastly easier to undertake monitoring as a basis for effective and meaningful adaptive management
4. Mining technology proposed by TTR is one that has been proven in marine mining conditions for over 20 years off the coast of Namibia in Southern Africa
5. Due to the shallow depth TTR is able to use marinised conventional drilling systems for Mineral Resource definition enabling the iron sand resource to be reported to the JORC (2014) standard
6. Weight of expert evidence during TTRs hearing acknowledged that benthic recovery to pre mine conditions would most likely occur in less than 10 years, this is a much shorter time frame than would be expected in much deeper water systems.
Ends

Next in Business, Science, and Tech

What Lies Beneath Is The Housing Market Turning?
By: Quotable Value New Zealand
KiwiRail strike notices withdrawn following new offer
By: Rail And Maritime Transport Union
Stress Tests Show Strengthening Bank Resilience
By: Reserve Bank
Deputy Governor Reflects On Time At RBNZ
By: Reserve Bank
Data Reveals ICT Expenditure Key To Small Business Sales Growth
By: Xero
Fonterra Lifts Forecast Farmgate Milk Price Range And Revises Earnings Guidance At First Quarter Update
By: Fonterra
Canterbury Museum: New Research - Bald Haast's Eagle Feasted On Moa Guts
By: Canterbury Museum
View as: DESKTOP | MOBILE © Scoop Media