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Cookie Time Charitable Trust Approaches $1.5M Mark

Published: Thu 13 Jan 2011 11:47 AM
Cookie Time Charitable Trust Approaches $1.5 Million Mark in Helping Kiwi Kids
More than $200,000 has been raised for charity in the latest annual Cookie Time Christmas Cookies campaign, bringing the total raised to close to $1.5 million over the last seven years.
Each year since 2003, part of the proceeds from Cookie Time’s annual Christmas Cookies sales have been donated to the Cookie Time Charitable Trust, a registered charitable trust set up to help New Zealand kids discover their gifts.
The seven-week campaign this Christmas – also the 25th year that the iconic Christmas Cookies have been sold – raised funds for the Trust’s ongoing activities, with money from every bucket sold going to help children with dyslexia.
Lincoln Booth, Cookie Time general manager, says the result is on par with previous years, despite the tougher economic climate.
“Spending this Christmas has been more discretionary than ever, so we are delighted that we have been able to maintain our fund-raising momentum through Christmas Cookie sales. To give back more than $200,000 this year is hugely satisfying.”
Cookie Time was founded in 1983 by 21-year-old Michael Mayell. In 2003, he and co-owner (and brother) Guy Pope-Mayell decided they wanted to help make a difference to the lives of young New Zealanders and set up the Cookie Time Charitable Trust. The Trust focuses particularly on two areas: innovation in learning, and dyslexia. As principal sponsor of the Dyslexia Foundation of New Zealand (DFNZ), this includes supporting initiatives designed to nurture and celebrate the creative power that dyslexia can deliver in innovative thinking, artistic ability, creative problem solving and entrepreneurship.
A big focus for DFNZ is its 4D schools programme, which provides guidance on effective action to benefit children with dyslexia, as well as all those with learning differences. Unrecognised dyslexia can be a significant contributor to self-esteem and social issues. However, understood and addressed, it can be an awesome creative force. Children have great imaginations, and dyslexic children are often capable of wonderful ‘out of the box’ thinking that can set them up for great success in life.
The 4D programme is based on a ‘notice and adjust’ approach – encouraging teachers to notice where issues are occurring and adjust the classroom environment or teaching style to help children reach their full potential. In this way, small changes can make a big difference to everyday lives.
Photo caption: Christmas Cookies with a cause: Cookie Time's Sarah McGirr
ENDS

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